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Ureterocele

Incontinence - ureterocele

A ureterocele is a swelling at the bottom of one of the ureters. Ureters are the tubes that carry urine from the kidney to the bladder. The swollen area can block urine flow.

A ureterocele is a birth defect.

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Female urinary tract
Male urinary tract
Ureterocele

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Causes

A ureterocele occurs in the lower part of the ureter. It is the part where the tube enters the bladder. The swollen area prevents urine from moving freely into the bladder. The urine collects in the ureter and stretches its walls. It expands like a water balloon.

A ureterocele can also cause urine to flow backward from the bladder to the kidney. This is called reflux.

Ureteroceles occur in about 1 in 500 people. This condition is equally common in both the left and right ureters.

Symptoms

Most people with ureteroceles do not have any symptoms. When symptoms do occur, they may include:

Some other symptoms are:

Exams and Tests

Large ureteroceles are often diagnosed earlier than smaller ones. It may be discovered in a pregnancy ultrasound before the baby is born.

Some people with ureteroceles do not know they have the condition. Often, the problem is found later in life due to kidney stones or infection.

A urinalysis may reveal blood in the urine or signs of urinary tract infection.

The following tests may be done:

Blood pressure may be high if there is kidney damage.

Treatment

Antibiotics are often given to prevent further infections until surgery can be done.

The goal of treatment is to eliminate the blockage. Drains placed in the ureter or renal area (stents) may provide short-term relief of symptoms.

Surgery to repair the ureterocele cures the condition in most cases. Your surgeon may cut into the ureterocele. Another surgery may involve removing the ureterocele and reattaching the ureter to the bladder. The type of surgery depends on your age, overall health, and extent of the blockage.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outcome varies. The damage may be temporary if the blockage can be cured. However, damage to the kidney may be permanent if the condition doesn't go away.

Kidney failure is uncommon. The other kidney will most often work normally.

Possible Complications

Complications may include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of ureterocele.

Related Information

Ultrasound
Ultrasound pregnancy
Urinary tract infection - adults
Chronic
Obstructive uropathy
Injury - kidney and ureter
Urinary tract infection - children

References

Guay-Woodford LM. Hereditary nephropathies and developmental abnormalities of the urinary tract. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 128.

Peters CA, Mendelsohn C. Ectopic ureter, ureterocele, and ureteral anomalies. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 134.

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Review Date: 7/17/2018  

Reviewed By: Sovrin M. Shah, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Urology, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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