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Iron in diet

Diet - iron; Ferric acid; Ferrous acid; Ferritin

Iron is a mineral found in every cell of the body. Iron is considered an essential mineral because it is needed to make hemoglobin, a part of blood cells.

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Iron supplements

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Function

The human body needs iron to make the oxygen-carrying proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. Hemoglobin is found in red blood cells. Myoglobin is found in muscles.

Food Sources

The best sources of iron include:

Reasonable amounts of iron are also found in lamb, pork, and shellfish.

Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, and supplements is harder for the body to absorb. These sources include:

Dried fruits:

Legumes:

Seeds:

Vegetables:

Whole grains:

If you mix some lean meat, fish, or poultry with beans or dark leafy greens at a meal, you can improve absorption of vegetable sources of iron up to three times. Foods rich in vitamin C (such as citrus, strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) also increase iron absorption. Cooking foods in a cast-iron skillet can also help to increase the amount of iron provided.

Some foods reduce iron absorption. For example, commercial black or pekoe teas contain substances that bind to dietary iron so it cannot be used by the body.

Side Effects

LOW IRON LEVEL

The human body stores some iron to replace any that is lost. However, low iron level over a long period of time can lead to iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms include lack of energy, shortness of breath, headache, irritability, dizziness, or weight loss. Physical signs of lack of iron are a pale tongue and spoon-shaped nails.

Those at risk for low iron level includes:

Babies and young children are at risk for low iron level if they do not get the right foods. Babies moving to solid foods should eat iron-rich foods. Infants are born with enough iron to last about six months. An infant's extra iron needs are met by breast milk. Infants that are not breastfed should be given an iron supplement or iron-fortified infant formula.

Children between age 1 and 4 grow fast. This uses up iron in the body. Children of this age should be given iron-fortified foods or an iron supplement.

Milk is a very poor source of iron. Children who drink large quantities of milk and avoid other foods may develop "milk anemia." Recommended milk intake is 2 to 3 cups (480 to 720 milliliters) per day for toddlers.

TOO MUCH IRON

The genetic disorder called hemochromatosis affects the body's ability to control how much iron is absorbed. This leads to too much iron in the body. Treatment consists of a low-iron diet, no iron supplements, and phlebotomy (blood removal) on a regular basis.

It is unlikely that a person would take too much iron. However, children can sometimes develop iron poisoning by swallowing too many iron supplements. Symptoms of iron poisoning include:

Recommendations

The Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine recommends the following:

Infants and children

*AI or Adequate Intake

Males

Females

Women who are pregnant or producing breast milk may need different amounts of iron. Ask your health care provider what is right for you.

Related Information

Hemoglobin

References

Mason JB. Vitamins, trace minerals, and other micronutrients. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 218.

Maqbool A, Parks EP, Shaikhkhalil A, Panganiban J, Mitchell JA, Stallings VA. Nutritional requirements. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 55.

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Review Date: 2/2/2019  

Reviewed By: Emily Wax, RD, CNSC, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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