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Thirst - excessive

Increased thirst; Polydipsia; Excessive thirst

Excessive thirst is an abnormal feeling of always needing to drink fluids.

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Insulin production and diabetes

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Considerations

Drinking lots of water is healthy in most cases. The urge to drink too much may be the result of a physical or emotional disease. Excessive thirst may be a symptom of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), which may help in detecting diabetes.

Excessive thirst is a common symptom. It is often the reaction to fluid loss during exercise or to eating salty foods.

Causes

Causes may include:

Home Care

Because thirst is the body's signal to replace water loss, it is most often appropriate to drink plenty of liquids.

For thirst caused by diabetes, follow the prescribed treatment to properly control your blood sugar level.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if:

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

The provider will get your medical history and perform a physical exam.

The provider may ask you questions such as:

Tests that may be ordered include the following:

Your provider will recommend treatment if needed based on your exam and tests. For example, if tests show you have diabetes, you will need to get treated.

A very strong, constant urge to drink may be the sign of a psychological problem. You may need a psychological evaluation if the provider suspects this is a cause. Your fluid intake and output will be closely watched.

Related Information

Diabetes

References

Mortada R. Diabetes insipidus. In: Kellerman RD, Rakel DP, eds. Conn's Current Therapy 2019. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:277-280.

Slotki I, Skorecki K. Disorders of sodium and water homeostasis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 116.

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Review Date: 1/19/2019  

Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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