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Bilirubin blood test

Total bilirubin - blood; Unconjugated bilirubin - blood; Indirect bilirubin - blood; Conjugated bilirubin - blood; Direct bilirubin - blood; Jaundice - bilirubin blood test; Hyperbilirubinemia - bilirubin blood test

The bilirubin blood test measures the level of bilirubin in the blood. Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver.

Bilirubin can also be measured with a urine test.

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Blood test

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How the Test is Performed

A blood sample is needed.

How to Prepare for the Test

You should not eat or drink for at least 4 hours before the test. Your health care provider may instruct you to stop taking medicines that affect the test.

Many drugs may change the bilirubin level in your blood. Make sure your provider knows which medicines you are taking.

How the Test will Feel

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon goes away.

Why the Test is Performed

A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

A level of bilirubin in the blood of 2.0 mg/dL can lead to jaundice. Jaundice is a yellow color in the skin, mucus membranes, or eyes.

Jaundice is the most common reason to check bilirubin level. The test will likely be ordered when:

A bilirubin test is also ordered when the provider suspects a person has liver or gallbladder problems.

Normal Results

It is normal to have some bilirubin in the blood. A normal level is:

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or may test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

In newborns, bilirubin level is higher for the first few days of life. Your child's provider must consider the following when deciding whether your baby's bilirubin level is too high:

Jaundice can also occur when more red blood cells than normal are broken down. This can be caused by:

The following liver problems may also cause jaundice or a high bilirubin level:

The following problems with gallbladder or bile ducts may cause higher bilirubin levels:

Risks

There is little risk involved with having your blood taken. Veins vary in size from one person to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.

Risks associated with having blood drawn are slight, but may include:

Related Information

Hemoglobin
Liver disease
Bile
Metabolism
Albumin - blood (serum)
Sclera
Hemolytic disease of the newborn
Gilbert syndrome
Hemolytic anemia
Newborn jaundice
Sickle cell disease
Hemolytic transfusion reaction
Pernicious anemia
Bile duct obstruction
Cirrhosis
Crigler-Najjar syndrome
Dubin-Johnson syndrome
Hepatitis
Bile duct stricture
Cholangiocarcinoma
Cholangitis
Choledocholithiasis
Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency
Loss of brain function - liver disease
Aplastic anemia
Immune hemolytic anemia
Wilson disease
Newborn jaundice - discharge

References

Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Bilirubin (total, direct [conjugated] and indirect [unconjugated]) - serum. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures. 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:196-198.

Pincus MR, Tierno PM, Gleeson E, Bowne WB, Bluth MH. Evaluation of liver function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 23rd ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:chap 21.

Pratt DS. Liver chemistry and function tests. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 73.

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Review Date: 1/26/2019  

Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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