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Ear drainage culture

Culture - ear drainage

An ear drainage culture is a lab test. This test checks for germs that can cause infection. The sample taken for this test can contain fluid, pus, wax, or blood from the ear.

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Ear anatomy
Medical findings based on ear anatomy
Ear drainage culture

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How the Test is Performed

A sample of ear drainage is needed. Your health care provider will use a cotton swab to collect the sample from inside the outer ear canal. In some cases, a sample is collected from the middle ear during ear surgery.

The sample is sent to a lab and placed on a special dish (culture media).

The lab team checks the dish every day to see if bacteria, fungi, or viruses have grown. More tests may be done to look for specific germs and determine the best treatment.

How to Prepare for the Test

You do not need to prepare for this test.

How the Test will Feel

Using a cotton swab to take a sample of drainage from the outer ear is not painful. However, ear pain may be present if the ear is infected.

Ear surgery is done using general anesthesia. You will be asleep and feel no pain.

Why the Test is Performed

The test may be done if you or your child has:

It may also be done as a routine part of myringotomy.

Note: Ear infections are diagnosed based on symptoms rather than using a culture.

Normal Results

The test is normal if there is no growth on the culture.

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Abnormal results may be a sign of an infection. The infection can be caused by bacteria, virus, or fungus.

The test results may show which organism is causing the infection. It will help your provider decide on the right treatment.

Risks

No risks are involved with swabbing the ear canal. Ear surgery may involve some risks.

Related Information

Swimmer's ear
Otitis

References

Bauer CA, Jenkins HA. Otologic symptoms and syndromes. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 156.

Murray PR. The clinician and the microbiology laboratory. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 16.

Player B. Earache. In: Kliegman RM, Lye PS, Bordini BJ, Toth H, Basel D, eds. Nelson Pediatric Symptom-Based Diagnosis. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 4.

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Review Date: 8/5/2018  

Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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