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Bland diet

Heartburn - bland diet; Nausea - bland diet; Peptic ulcer - bland diet

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Description

A bland diet can be used alongside lifestyle changes to help address the symptoms of ulcers, heartburn, GERD, nausea, and vomiting. You may also need a bland diet after stomach or intestinal surgery.

Self-care

A bland diet includes foods that are soft, not very spicy, and low in fiber. If you are on a bland diet, you should not eat spicy, fried, or raw foods. You should not drink alcohol or drinks with caffeine in them.

Your health care provider will tell you when you can start eating other foods again. It is still important to eat healthy foods when you add foods back in. Your provider can refer you to a dietitian or nutritionist to help you plan a healthy diet.

Foods you can eat

Foods you can eat on a bland diet include:

Foods to Avoid

Some foods you may want to avoid when you are on a bland diet are:

You should also avoid medicine that contains aspirin or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin).

Other Diet Tips

When you are on a bland diet:

Related Information

Intestinal obstruction repair
Gallbladder removal - open
Large bowel resection
Small bowel resection
Gallbladder removal - laparoscopic
Ileostomy
Total abdominal colectomy
Total proctocolectomy and ileal-anal pouch
Total proctocolectomy with ileostomy
Crohn disease
Ulcerative colitis
Colon and rectal cancer
Ileostomy and your child
Ileostomy and your diet
Ileostomy - caring for your stoma
Types of ileostomy
Ileostomy - discharge
Living with your ileostomy
Large bowel resection - discharge
Small bowel resection - discharge
Total colectomy or proctocolectomy - discharge
Anti-reflux surgery - discharge
Pancreatitis - discharge
Clear liquid diet
Full liquid diet
Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor

References

Thompson M, Noel MB. Nutrition and family medicine. In: Rakel RE, Rakel DP, eds. Textbook of Family Medicine. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 37.

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Review Date: 1/13/2018  

Reviewed By: Emily Wax, RD, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Brooklyn, NY. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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