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ACE inhibitors

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors

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Description

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are medicines. They treat heart, blood vessel, and kidney problems.

How ACE inhibitors help

ACE inhibitors are used to treat heart disease. These medicines make your heart work less hard by lowering your blood pressure. This keeps some kinds of heart disease from getting worse. Most people who have heart failure take these medicines.

These medicines treat high blood pressure, strokes, or heart attacks. They may help lower your risk for stroke or heart attack.

They are also used to treat diabetes and kidney problems. This can help keep your kidneys from getting worse. If you have these problems, ask your health care provider if you should be taking these medicines.

Types of ACE inhibitors

There are many different names and brands of ACE inhibitors. Most work as well as another. Side effects may be different for different ones.

Taking Your ACE inhibitors

ACE inhibitors are pills that you take by mouth. Take all of your medicines as your provider told you to. Follow-up with your provider regularly. Your provider will check your blood pressure and do blood tests to make sure the medicines are working properly. Your provider may change your dose from time to time. In addition:

Side effects

Side effects from ACE inhibitors are rare.

You may have a dry cough. This may go away after a while. It also may start after you have been taking the medicine for some time. Tell your provider if you develop a cough. Sometimes reducing your dose helps. But sometimes, your provider will switch you to a different medicine. DO NOT lower your dose without talking with your provider first.

You may feel dizzy or lightheaded when you start taking these medicines, or if your provider increases your dose. Standing up slowly from a chair or your bed may help. If you have a fainting spell, call your provider right away.

Other side effects include:

If your tongue or lips swell, call your provider right away, or go to the emergency room. You may be having a serious allergic reaction to the medicine. This is very rare.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if you are having any of the side effects listed above. Also call your provider if you are having any other unusual symptoms.

Related Information

Heart failure - overview
Type 2 diabetes
High blood pressure - adults
Diabetes and kidney disease
Diabetes - when you are sick
Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke
Diabetes - taking care of your feet
Diabetes tests and checkups
Diabetes and exercise
Diabetes - keeping active
Low blood sugar - self-care
Managing your blood sugar
Angina - discharge
Heart attack - discharge
Angioplasty and stent - heart - discharge
Aspirin and heart disease
Being active when you have heart disease
Cardiac catheterization - discharge
Controlling your high blood pressure
Heart failure - discharge
Stroke - discharge
Type 2 diabetes - what to ask your doctor
Heart failure - what to ask your doctor
High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

References

Mann DL. Management of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann DL, Tomaselli GF, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2019:chap 25.

Whelton PK, Carey RM, Aronow WS, et al. 2017 ACC/AHA/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/AGS/APhA/ASH/ASPC/NMA/PCNA guideline for the prevention, detection, evaluation, and management of high blood pressure in adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on clinical practice guidelines. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018;71(19):e127-e248. PMID: 29146535 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29146535.

Yancy CW, Jessup M, Bozkurt B, et al. 2013 ACCF/AHA guideline for the management of heart failure: executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. Circulation. 2013;128(16):1810-1852. PMID: 23741057 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23741057.

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Review Date: 7/25/2018  

Reviewed By: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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