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Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

Gamma knife - discharge; Cyberknife - discharge; Stereotactic radiotherapy - discharge; Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy - discharge; Cyclotrons - discharge; Linear accelerator - discharge; Lineacs - discharge; Proton beam radiosurgery - discharge

You received stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or radiotherapy. This is a form of radiation therapy that focuses high-power x-rays onto a small area of your brain or spine.

After you go home, follow your health care provider's instructions on how to care for yourself. Use the information below as a reminder.

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When You're in the Hospital

More than one system is used to perform radiosurgery. You may have been treated with CyberKnife or GammaKnife.

You may have a headache or feel dizzy after your treatment. This should go away over time.

Self-care

If you had pins that held a frame in place, they will be removed before you go home.

If you had anchors placed, they will be taken out when you have received all of your treatments. While the anchors are in place:

If there are no complications, such as swelling, most people go back to their regular activities the next day. Some people are kept in the hospital overnight for monitoring. You may develop black eyes during the week after surgery, but it is nothing to worry about.

You should be able to eat normal foods after your treatment. Ask your provider about when to return to work.

Medicines to prevent brain swelling, nausea, and pain might be prescribed. Take them as instructed.

Follow-up

You'll most likely need to have an MRI, CT scan, or angiogram a few weeks or months after the procedure. Your provider will schedule your follow-up visit.

You may need additional treatments:

When to Call the Doctor

Call your doctor if you have:

Related Information

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References

Radiological Society of North America website. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info.cfm?pg=stereotactic. Updated February 17, 2017. Accessed August 22, 2018.

Yu JS, Brown M, Suh JH, Ma L, Sahgal A. Radiobiology of radiotherapy and radiosurgery. In: Winn HR, ed. Youmans and Winn Neurological Surgery. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 262.

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Review Date: 7/9/2018  

Reviewed By: Luc Jasmin, MD, PhD, FRCS (C), FACS, Department of Surgery, Holston Valley Medical Center, TN; Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at UCSF, San Francisco, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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