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Clear liquid diet

Surgery - clear liquid diet; Medical test - clear liquid diet

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Description

A clear liquid diet is made up of only clear fluids and foods that are clear fluids when they are at room temperature. It includes things such as:

Why You May Need This Diet

You may need to be on a clear liquid diet right before a medical test or procedure, or before certain kinds of surgery. It is important to follow the diet exactly to avoid problems with your procedure or surgery or your test results.

You also may need to be on a clear liquid diet for a little while after you have had surgery on your stomach or intestine. You may also be instructed to follow this diet if you:

What You Can Eat and Drink

You can eat or drink only the things you can see through. These include:

These foods and liquids are NOT OK:

Try having a mix of 3 to 5 of these choices for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It is OK to add sugar and lemon to your tea.

Your doctor might ask you to avoid liquids that have red coloring for some tests, such as a colonoscopy.

DO NOT follow this diet without the supervision of your doctor. Healthy people should not be on this diet longer than 3 to 4 days.

This diet is safe for people with diabetes, but only for a short time when they are followed closely by their doctor.

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References

Compass Group. Clear liquid diet. Manual of Clinical Nutrition Management. bscn2k15.weebly.com/uploads/1/2/9/2/12924787/manual_of_clinical_nutrition2013.pdf. Updated 2013. Accessed August 2, 2018.

Schattner MA, Grossman EB. Nutritional management. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 6.

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Review Date: 7/14/2018  

Reviewed By: Emily Wax, RD, CNSC, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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