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Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

Carotid angioplasty and stenting - discharge; CAS - discharge; Angioplasty of the carotid artery - discharge

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Atherosclerosis of internal carotid artery

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When You're in the Hospital

You had an angioplasty done when you were in the hospital. You may have also had a stent (a tiny wire mesh tube) placed in the blocked area to keep it open. Both of these were done to open a narrowed or blocked artery that supplies blood to your brain.

Your health care provider inserted a catheter (flexible tube) into an artery through an incision (cut) in your groin or your arm.

Your provider used live x-rays to carefully guide the catheter up to the area of the blockage in your carotid artery.

Then your provider passed a guide wire through the catheter to the blockage. A balloon catheter was pushed over the guide wire and into the blockage. The tiny balloon on the end was inflated. This opened the blocked artery.

What to Expect at Home

You should be able to do most of your normal activities within a few days, but take it easy.

Self-care

If your provider put the catheter in through your groin:

You will need to care for your incision.

Having carotid artery surgery does not cure the cause of the blockage in your arteries. Your arteries may become narrow again. To lower your chances of this happening:

When to Call the Doctor

Call your health care provider if:

Related Information

Stroke
Transient ischemic attack
Tips on how to quit smoking
Risks of tobacco
Carotid artery surgery
Carotid artery disease
Recovering after stroke
Stent
Aspirin and heart disease
Cholesterol and lifestyle
Antiplatelet drugs - P2Y12 inhibitors
Controlling your high blood pressure
Carotid artery surgery - discharge
Cholesterol - drug treatment

References

Brott TG, Halperin JL, Abbara S, et al. 2011 ASA/ACCF/AHA/AANN/AANS/ACR/ASNR/CNS/SAIP/SCAI/SIR/SNIS/SVM/SVS guideline on the management of patients with extracranial carotid and vertebral artery disease: executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, and the American Stroke Association, American Association of Neuroscience Nurses, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, American College of Radiology, American Society of Neuroradiology, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, Society of Atherosclerosis Imaging and Prevention, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery, Society for Vascular Medicine, and Society for Vascular Surgery. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011;57(8):1002-1044. PMID: 21288680 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21288680.

Cheng CC, Cheema F, Fankhauser G, Silva MB. Peripheral arterial disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 62.

Kinlay S, Bhatt DL. Treatment of noncoronary obstructive vascular disease. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann, DL, Tomaselli GF, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 66.

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Review Date: 3/13/2019  

Reviewed By: Alireza Minagar, MD, MBA, Professor, Department of Neurology, LSU Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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