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Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular - discharge

AAA repair - endovascular - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular - discharge; EVAR - discharge; Endovascular aneurysm repair - discharge

Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is surgery to repair a widened area in your aorta. This is called an aneurysm. The aorta is the large artery that carries blood to your belly, pelvis, and legs.

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Aortic aneurysm

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When You're in the Hospital

You had endovascular aortic surgery repair for an aneurysm (a widened part) of the large artery that carries blood to your lower body (aorta).

To perform the procedure:

What to Expect at Home

The cut in your groin may be sore for several days. You should be able to walk farther now without needing to rest. But you should take it easy at first. It may take 6 to 8 weeks to fully recover. You may feel discomfort in your abdomen for a few days. You may also have a loss of appetite. This will get better over the next week. You may have constipation or diarrhea for a short time.

Self-care

You will need to increase your activity slowly while the incision heals.

You will need to take care of your incision.

When you are resting, try keeping your legs raised above the level of your heart. Place pillows or blankets under your legs to raise them.

Ask your provider about follow-up x-rays you will need to have to check if your new graft is OK. Having regular checkups to make sure your graft is working well is a very important part of your care.

Your provider may ask you to take aspirin or another medicine called clopidogrel (Plavix) when you go home. These medicines are antiplatelet agents. They prevent the platelets in your blood from clumping together and forming clots in your arteries or stent. DO NOT stop taking them without talking with your provider first.

Lifestyle Changes

Endovascular surgery does not cure the underlying problem with your blood vessels. Other blood vessels could be affected in the future. Therefore, it is important to make the lifestyle changes and take the medicines your provider recommends.

Take all medicines your doctor has prescribed as directed. This may include medicines to lower cholesterol, manage high blood pressure, and treat diabetes.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if:

Related Information

Abdominal aortic aneurysm
Hardening of the arteries
Thoracic aortic aneurysm
Tips on how to quit smoking
Risks of tobacco
Abdominal CT scan
Abdominal MRI scan
Aortic angiography
Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular
Stent
Cholesterol and lifestyle
Controlling your high blood pressure
Cholesterol - drug treatment

References

Binster CJ, Sternbergh WC. Endovascular aneurysm repair techniques. In: Sidawy AN, Perler BA, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 73.

Braverman AC, Schermerhorn M. Diseases of the aorta. In: Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Mann DL, Tomaselli GF, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 63.

Hammond CJ, Nicholson AA. Aortic intervention. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015:chap 85.

Osgood MJ, Black JH. Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical Therapy. 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:907-916.

Tracci MC, Cherry KJ. The aorta. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 61.

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Review Date: 4/5/2018  

Reviewed By: Michael Sobel, MD, Professor of Vascular Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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