Site Map

The day of your surgery - adult

Same-day surgery - adult; Ambulatory surgery - adult; Surgical procedure - adult; Preoperative care - day of surgery

I Would Like to Learn About:

Description

You are scheduled to have surgery. Learn about what to expect on the day of surgery so that you will be prepared.

The doctor's office will let you know what time you should arrive on the day of surgery. This may be early in the morning.

What to Expect Before Surgery

The anesthesia and surgery team will talk with you before surgery. You may meet with them at an appointment before the day of surgery or on the same day of surgery. Expect them to:

You will need to sign admission papers and consent forms for surgery and anesthesia. Bring these items to make it easier:

What to Expect on the day of Surgery

At home on the day of surgery:

Here is what to bring and what to leave at home:

Plan to arrive at your surgery unit at the scheduled time. You may need to arrive up to 2 hours before surgery.

The staff will prepare you for surgery. They will:

What to Expect After Surgery

You will go to the recovery room after surgery. How long you stay there depends on the surgery you had, your anesthesia, and how fast you wake up. If you are going home, you will be discharged after:

If you are staying at the hospital, you will be transferred to a hospital room. The nurses there will:

What to Expect Going Home

You should expect to:

References

Neumayer L, Ghalyaie N. Principles of preoperative and operative surgery. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 10.

Smith SF, Duell DJ, Martin BC, Aebersold M, Gonzalez L. Perioperative care. In: Smith SF, Duell DJ, Martin BC, Gonzalez L, Aebersold M, eds. Clinical Nursing Skills: Basic to Advanced Skills. 9th ed. New York, NY: Pearson; 2016:chap 26.

BACK TO TOP

Review Date: 9/3/2018  

Reviewed By: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

ADAM Quality Logo

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, for Health Content Provider (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2019 A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.