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Flat bones

 

Flat bones are made up of a layer of spongy bone between two thin layers of compact bone. They have a flat shape, not rounded. Examples include the skull and rib bones. Flat bones have marrow, but they do not have a bone marrow cavity.

 

References

Reith JD. Bone and joints. In: Goldblum JR, Lamps LW, McKenney JK, Myers JL, eds. Rosai and Ackerman's Surgical Pathology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 40.

Silverstein JA, Moeller JL, Hutchinson MR. Common issues in orthopedics. In: Rakel RE, Rakel DP, eds. Textbook of Family Medicine. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 30.

Text only

 
  • Skull

    Skull - illustration

    The skull is the bony structure of the head and face. The cranium surrounds the brain with the temporal, frontal, parietal and occipital bones. The maxilla, or upper jaw, and the mandible, or lower jaw, support the facial features of nose, mouth and eyes.

    Skull

    illustration

  • Ribs and lung anatomy

    Ribs and lung anatomy - illustration

    The ribs are the skeletal protection for the lungs and the chest cavity. The ribs and rib muscles expand and contract with normal breathing.

    Ribs and lung anatomy

    illustration

    • Skull

      Skull - illustration

      The skull is the bony structure of the head and face. The cranium surrounds the brain with the temporal, frontal, parietal and occipital bones. The maxilla, or upper jaw, and the mandible, or lower jaw, support the facial features of nose, mouth and eyes.

      Skull

      illustration

    • Ribs and lung anatomy

      Ribs and lung anatomy - illustration

      The ribs are the skeletal protection for the lungs and the chest cavity. The ribs and rib muscles expand and contract with normal breathing.

      Ribs and lung anatomy

      illustration

    A Closer Look

     

      Talking to your MD

       

        Self Care

         

          Tests for Flat bones

           
             

            Review Date: 10/8/2017

            Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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