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Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

 

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy uses a special pressure chamber to increase the amount of oxygen in the blood.

Information

Some hospitals have a hyperbaric chamber. Smaller units may be available in outpatient centers.

The air pressure inside a hyperbaric oxygen chamber is about two and a half times higher than the normal pressure in the atmosphere. This helps your blood carry more oxygen to organs and tissues in your body.

The other benefits of increased pressure of oxygen in the tissues may include:

  • More and improved oxygen supply
  • Reduction in swelling and edema
  • Stopping infection

Hyperbaric therapy can help wounds, particularly infected wounds, heal more quickly. The therapy may be used to treat:

  • Air or gas embolism
  • Bone infections (osteomyelitis) that have not improved with other treatments
  • Burns
  • Crush injuries
  • Frost bites
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Certain types of brain or sinus infections
  • Decompression sickness (for example, a diving injury)
  • Gas gangrene
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infections
  • Radiation injury (for example, damage from radiation therapy for cancer)
  • Skin grafts
  • Wounds that have not healed with other treatments (for example, it may be used to treat a foot ulcer in someone with diabetes or very bad circulation)

This treatment may also be used to provide enough oxygen to the lung during a procedure called whole lung lavage, which is used to clean an entire lung in people with certain medical conditions.

Treatment for long-term (chronic) conditions may be repeated over days or weeks. A treatment session for more acute conditions such as decompression sickness may last longer, but may not need to be repeated.

You might feel pressure in your ears while you are in the hyperbaric chamber. Your ears may pop when you get out of the chamber.

 

References

Bove AA, Neuman TS. Diving medicine. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 78.

Lumb AB. Oxygen toxicity and hyperoxia. In: Lumb AB, ed. Nunn's Applied Respiratory Physiology. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 24.

Marston WA. Wound care. In: Sidawy AN, Perler BA, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 115.

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                Review Date: 7/20/2018

                Reviewed By: Allen J. Blaivas, DO, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, VA New Jersey Health Care System, Clinical Assistant Professor, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, East Orange, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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