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Golf and Physical Therapy: June 7, 2019

It’s a popular activity in Southwest Florida. “It’s a great way to stay active. We want people to stay active as long as possible,” said Morgan Lemos, a physical therapist with Lee Health.

But many hours and improper form can put even the most seasoned golfer at risk for an injury. “Despite being a low impact sport, 60 percent of professional golfers and 40 percent of amateur golfers suffer some kind of an injury each year,” said Lemos.

Back pain and shoulder pain are the most common injuries related to golf, so physical therapists encourage people to stretch before and after they play. “We’re working with different golfers in the community, and we’re working on mobility and injury prevention and extending people’s careers in being able to play golf longer into their years,” she said.

Using a special screening, from the Titlist Performance Institute, Lee Health physical therapists can evaluate patients to determine what’s causing the pain. “We’ll have them do these 16 movements, and it’s a pass-fail kind of thing, can they do this can they not do this? And then we analyze the data from that test to identify where the dysfunction is happening,” explained Lemos.

Once therapists determine the problem, they can recommend exercises to help alleviate the pain.

“We see postural deficits from just prolonged sitting where the spine is curved or slouched, so right away looking at the posture of a person can totally affect their golf swing too,” she said.

Using strengthening techniques, special exercises, and making changes to their form can help patients get back on the course and prevent future golf-related injuries.


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