X-Ray Images with Fluoroscopy

fluoroscopy

About This Imaging Test

Fluoroscopy is a study of moving body structures. It’s much like an X-ray "movie" and is often done while a contrast dye moves through the part of the body being examined. A continuous X-ray beam is passed through the body part and sent to a video monitor so that the body part and its motion can be seen in detail. Fluoroscopy, as an imaging tool, allows healthcare providers to look at many body systems, including the skeletal, digestive, urinary, cardiovascular, respiratory, and reproductive systems.

Fluoroscopy may be used to evaluate specific areas of the body. These include the bones, muscles, and joints, as well as solid organs, such as the heart, lung, or kidneys.


How the Test is Performed

Fluoroscopy may be done on an outpatient basis or as part of your stay in a hospital. Procedures may vary depending on your condition and your healthcare provider's practices.

Generally, fluoroscopy follows this process:

  • You will be asked to remove any clothing or jewelry that may get in the way of the body area to be examined. A bracelet with your name and an identification number may be put on your wrist. You may get a second bracelet if you have allergies.
  • If you are asked to remove your clothing, you will be given a gown to wear.
  • A contrast substance or dye may be given, depending on the type of procedure that is being done. You may get the contrast by swallowing it, as an enema, or in an intravenous (IV) line in your hand or arm. It is used to better visualize the organs or structures being studied.
  • You will be positioned on the X-ray table. Depending on the type of procedure, you may be asked to move into different positions, move a certain body part, or hold your breath for a short time while the fluoroscopy is being done.
  • For procedures that require catheter insertion, such as cardiac catheterization or catheter placement into a joint or other body part, a needle may be put into the groin, elbow, or other site.
  • A special X-ray scanner will be used to produce the fluoroscopic images of the body structure being examined or treated.
  • In the case of arthrography (visualization of a joint), any fluid in the joint may be aspirated (removed with a needle and syringe) before the contrast dye is injected. After the contrast is injected, you may be asked to move the joint for a few minutes in order to spread the contrast throughout the joint.
  • The type of procedure being done and the body part being examined and/or treated will determine the length of the procedure.
  • After the procedure has been completed, the IV line will be removed.

While fluoroscopy itself is not painful, the particular procedure being done may be painful, such as the injection into a joint or accessing of an artery or vein for angiography. In these cases, the radiologist will take all comfort measures possible, which could include local anesthesia (numbing drugs), conscious sedation (medicines to make you sleepy), or general anesthesia (medicines to put you into a deep sleep and not feel pain), depending on the particular procedure.


Hospitals/Medical Centers

Cape Coral Hospital
  • 636 Del Prado Blvd.
  • Cape Coral, FL 33990
Hours:
Hours vary depending on the type of unit, the level of care, patient needs or physicians' instructions. Please call for unit hours.
cape coral hospital
  • Phone: 239-424-2000
Gulf Coast Medical Center
  • 13681 Doctor's Way
  • Fort Myers, FL 33912
  • (Located at Daniels and Metro Parkway)
Hours:
Hours vary depending on the type of unit, the level of care, patient needs or physicians' instructions. Please call for unit hours.
gulf coast medical center
  • Phone: 239-343-1000
HealthPark Medical Center
  • 9981 S. HealthPark Drive
  • Fort Myers, FL 33908
  • (Located at Summerlin and Bass Road)
Hours:
Hours vary depending on the type of unit, the level of care, patient needs or physicians' instructions. Please call for unit hours.
HealthPark Medical Center
  • Phone: 239-343-5000
Lee Memorial Hospital
  • 2776 South Cleveland Ave.
  • Fort Myers, FL 33901
  • (Located on US 41 near downtown Fort Myers )
Hours:
Hours vary depending on the type of unit, the level of care, patient needs or physicians' instructions. Please call for unit hours.
lee memorial hospital
  • Phone: 239-343-2000

Specialty Centers

Imaging and Radiology - Outpatient MRI
  • 7331 College Parkway
  • Fort Myers, FL 33919
  • Imaging Available:
  • MRI
Hours:
Mon - Fri: 8am - 3:30pm
location image not found
  • Phone: 239-343-3338

Outpatient Locations

Imaging and Radiology
  • Outpatient Center at Riverwalk *
  • 12600 Creekside Lane
  • Suite 1
  • Fort Myers, FL 33919
  • Imaging Available:
  • CT, MRI Open High Field, Ultrasound, X-Ray, Fluoroscopy
Hours:
Mon - Fri: 7am - 7pm
Sat: 8am - 12:30pm

* An outpatient department of Lee Memorial Hospital

location riverwalk
  • Phone: 239-424-1499
  • Fax: 239-424-1439
Imaging and Radiology
  • Outpatient Center at The Sanctuary *
  • 8960 Colonial Center Drive
  • Fort Myers, FL 33905
  • Imaging Available:
  • All services digital, CT, Fluoroscopy, MRI, MRI/Arthrograms, Nuclear Medicine, Ultrasound, X-Ray
Hours:
Mon - Fri : 7am - 6pm
location sanctuary
  • Phone: 239-424-1499
  • Fax: 239-424-1439
Outpatient Center at Surfside *
  • 2441 Surfside Blvd.
  • Suite 104
  • Cape Coral, FL 33914
Hours:
Hours of operation vary per service. Please call for hours.

* An outpatient department of Lee Memorial Hospital

Outpatient Radiology Center at Surfside
  • Phone: 239-424-1499
Imaging and Radiology
  • Outpatient Center at HealthPark Commons *
  • 16281 Bass Road
  • Suite 202
  • Fort Myers, FL 33908
  • Imaging Available:
  • CT, Dexa, EKG, Mammogram – Digital, MRI, Nuclear Medicine, Ultrasound, X-Ray, Fluoroscopy
Hours:
Mon - Fri: 7am - 5pm
Sat: 8am - 12pm
Outpatient Pediatric Center
  • Phone: 239-343-7247
  • Fax: 239-343-5197