Imaging Without Ionizing Radiation

pet/ct

About This Imaging Test

A positron emission tomography (PET) scan is an imaging test that allows your doctor to check for diseases in your body.

The scan uses a special dye that has radioactive tracers. These tracers are injected into a vein in your arm. Your organs and tissues then absorb the tracer. When highlighted under a PET scanner, the tracers help your doctor to see how well your organs and tissues are working. The PET scan can measure blood flow, oxygen use, glucose metabolism (how your body uses sugar), and much more.


How the Test is Performed

Before the scan, you’ll get tracers through a vein in your arm, through a solution you drink, or in a gas you inhale. Your body needs time to absorb the tracers, so you’ll wait about an hour before the scan begins.

Next, you’ll undergo the scan. This involves lying on a narrow table attached to a PET machine, which looks like a giant letter “O.” The table glides slowly into the machine so that the scan can be conducted.

You’ll need to lie still during the scan. The technician will let you know when it is that you need to remain still. You may be asked to hold your breath for short periods. You’ll hear buzzing and clicking noises during the test.

When all the necessary images have been recorded, you will slide out of the machine. The test is then complete.


Specialty Centers

Regional Cancer Center *
  • 8931 Colonial Center Dr.
  • Fort Myers, FL 33905
Hours:
Mon - Fri : 7am - 5:30pm

* An outpatient department of Lee Memorial Hospital

regional-cancer-center
  • Phone: 239-343-9504