Stress Management

Stop for a moment and take a deep breath. Work, family, money, technology, politics, relationships – the pressure piles up and gets to all of us. Many of us fight silent battles each day against stress and anxiety. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Managing stress is essential for finding a sense of hope and purpose. Learning to harness the strength of your mind opens up the power of possibilities for the rest of your life.

Chronic stress leads to chronic problems: Irritability, weight gain or loss, and even stroke or heart disease. Left untreated, stress quickly takes over your life and feeds on itself, putting up dangerous roadblocks wherever you turn. But you have the power to take your life back. Let our experts help you find that perfect outlet.

Stress management services

Talking to your primary care physician is the perfect start. They will listen with compassion and prescribe medication, suggest dietary changes, and put you on an exercise plan, if necessary. They also make referrals to behavioral and mental health specialists who will root out the cause of your stress and provide techniques to battle anxiety.

Our four Healthy Life Center locations feature seminars on stress relief, and you will also have the chance to exercise, take a yoga or meditation class, or learn the latest techniques in relaxation. Acupuncture and massage therapy help ease anxiety.


  • Massage
  • Meditation
  • Acupuncture
  • Lifestyle Coaching
  • Fitness
  • Craniosacral Therapy
  • Hypnotherapy
  • Amethyst Mat
  • Steam Rooms
  • The Lift Project
  • Therapy Pool

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Dealing with Stress

Whether it’s traffic, work, or a relationship, health experts say stress is normal and can be triggered by anything. “Stress is not necessarily a bad thing, it’s when we have unmanaged stress that goes on for unrelenting periods of time that it becomes a problem,” explained Jayme Hodges, director of behavioral health at Lee Health.